Share

Lowchen

Trainability:
Shedding:
Energy level:
Watchdog:
Good with kids:
Popularity:

What He's Like:

The Lowchen is a loving, lively, happy, playful and sensitive dog. He loves to romp, but also wants to be close to you and to nestle in your lap. He will stay near your feet and follow you devotedly from room to room. He craves your attention and doesn't like to be left alone for too long. He wants to be your close companion. He loves his family and is in return a fearless, protective dog who watches over his house and territory. He will stand up to any challenge--his name means "the little lion"--and he will bark intently at unexpected noises, strangers, and even much larger dogs. He may bark for too long unless he is taught otherwise. He usually makes friends quickly, however, and is generally happy and polite around other people, dogs, and family pets. He is easy to train and eager to please you. He doesn't need a great deal of exercise, but he does need some play-time in the yard or in a park, and he likes a daily walk. He should always be on a leash while walking, since he is fond of chasing squirrels. He can dig if left alone in a yard. He adores playing with children, and is very good and loving around them as long as they remember that he is a gentle dog as well as a courageous one. He virtually does not shed, and would make a good pet if you are a clean-freak.

Appearance

The Lowchen is 10 to 14 inches tall (to shoulders) and weighs 8 to 18 pounds. He has a long, soft coat. His coat can be any color: black, silver, tan, blue, cream, red, white, gold, brown, or a combination of two colors.

Grooming

You will only have to brush him occasionally. Pet coat: Clipped short every few months. Show coat: Clipped and scissored into shape every 6 weeks.

History

The Lowchen, or "Little Lion" in German, can be traced back to 16th-century Europe, where he was popular among the nobility of Germany, France, Spain and Italy. His image appears in tapestries and art from the period, and he can be seen in the paintings of Goya. By the 19th and 20th centuries however the breed was disappearing, and during the 1960's the Lowchen was declared one of the rarest dogs in the world. A Belgian breeder helped to restore his numbers, and now the "Little Lion" is slowly rebuilding his fame and popularity. His AKC popularity was 139th out of 157 breeds in 2007.

Photos:

Submit a photo of your Lowchen

 
  • Lowchen
  • Lowchen
  • Lowchen
  • Cossus Harry Belafonte, the Lowchen
  • Cossus Harry Belafonte, the Lowchen
  • Cenna Aya Alwaro, the Lowchen
  • Portia, the Lowchen
  • Martha
  • cookie